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President Biden, on August 16, 2022, signed the Inflation Reduction Act ( P.L. 117-169) into law following its passage along party lines in both chambers of Congress.


President Biden signed the CHIPS and Science Act into law after it received bipartisan support in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.


Department of the Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen is seeking a detailed plan from the Internal Revenue Service on how it plans to spend to the $80 billion in additional funds that the agency received as part of the Inflation Reduction Act that was signed by President Biden on August 16, 2022.


National Taxpayer Advocate Erin Collins has taken an "unusual step" to appeal an Internal Revenue Service Deputy Commissioners’ decision directly to Commissioner Charles Rettig for reconsideration regarding the use of scanning technology for paper tax returns.


The IRS and the Security Summit partners have warned tax professionals to beware of evolving identity theft scams perpetrated through phishing emails and SMS-text that are designed to trick practitioners into opening embedded links or attachments that infect their computer systems with the potential to steal personal and client information such as passwords, bank account numbers, credit card numbers, or social security numbers.


The IRS has extended the deadlines for amending a retirement plan or individual retirement arrangement (IRA) to reflect certain provisions of Division O of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020, P. L. 116-94, known as the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (SECURE Act), and Section 104 of Division M of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020, known as the Bipartisan American Miners Act of 2019 (Miners Act). In addition, the IRS has extended the deadline for amending a retirement plan to reflect Section 2203 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), P. L. 116-136.The extended amendment deadline for (1) a qualified retirement plan or Code Sec. 403(b) plan (including an applicable collectively bargained plan) that is not a governmental plan or (2) an IRA is December 31, 2025.


The Treasury and IRS have issued final regulations eliminating the signature requirement for making a Code Sec. 754 election (section 754 election). The regulations finalize 2017 proposed regulations ( REG-116256-17), on which taxpayers were entitled to rely.


The American Institute of CPAs highlighted several challenges that tax practitioners are experiencing with the use of the Internal Revenue Service’s Practitioner Priority Service (PPS) line.


The American Institute of CPAs offered up suggestions to Congress, focused on the trust and estate proposals found within the fiscal year 2023 revenue proposal, as the legislative branch considers the White House Budget request.


Technical corrections to the partnership audit rules were included in the bipartisan Consolidated Appropriations Act (CAA), 2018 ( P.L. 115-141), which was signed by President Trump on March 23. The omnibus spending package, which provides funding for the government and federal agencies through September 30, contains several tax provisions, including technical corrections to the partnership audit provisions of the Bipartisan Budget Act (BBA) of 2015 ( P.L. 114-74).


The IRS has announced a new optional safe harbor method, effective for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2013, for individuals to determine the amount of their deductible home office expenses (IR-2013-5, Rev. Proc. 2013-13). Being hailed by many as a long-overdue simplification option, taxpayers may now elect to determine their home office deduction by simply multiplying a prescribed rate by the square footage of the portion of the taxpayer's residence used for business purposes.


An above-the-line deduction is an adjustment to income (deduction) that can be taken regardless of whether the individual taxpayer itemizes deductions. The adjustment reduces the taxpayer's adjusted gross income (AGI). These adjustments are also sometimes called deductions from gross income, as opposed to itemized deductions that are deducted from AGI. An above-the-line deduction is taken out of income "above" the line on the tax form on which adjusted gross income is reported.


The IRS has issued proposed reliance regulations on the 3.8 percent surtax on net investment income (NII), enacted in the 2010 Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act. The regulations are proposed to be effective January 1, 2014. However, since the tax applies beginning January 1, 2013, the IRS stated that taxpayers may rely on the proposed regulations for 2013. The IRS expects to issue final regulations sometime later this year.


Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) are popular retirement savings vehicles that enable taxpayers to build their nest egg slowly over the years and enjoy tax benefits as well. But what happens to that nest egg when the IRA owner passes away?


If you have or are planning to move - whether it's a change of personal residence or a change of business address - you want the IRS to know about your change of address. The IRS has recently updated its procedures for taxpayers to follow when notifying the IRS of a change of address. The IRS uses a taxpayer's "address of record" for mailing certain notices and documents that the agency is required to send to a taxpayer's last known address.

If you have completed your tax return and you owe more money that you can afford to pay in full, do not worry, you have many options. While it is in your best interest to pay off as much of your tax liability as you can, there are many payment options you can utilize to help pay off your outstanding debt to Uncle Sam. This article discusses a few of your payment options.

Many taxpayers are looking for additional sources of cash during these tough economic times. For many individuals, their Individual Retirement Account (IRA) is one source of cash. You can withdraw ("borrow") money from your IRA, tax and penalty free, for up to 60 days. However, the ability to take a short-term "loan" from your IRA should only be taken in dire financial situations in light of the serious tax consequences that can result from an improper withdrawal or untimely rollover of the funds back into an IRA.

Nonbusiness creditors may deduct bad debts when they become totally worthless (i.e. there is no chance of its repayment). The proper year for the deduction can generally be established by showing that an insolvent debtor has not timely serviced a debt and has either refused to pay any part of the debt in the future, gone through bankruptcy, or disappeared. Thus, if you have loaned money to a friend or family member that you are unable to collect, you may have a bad debt that is deductible on your personal income tax return.

Every year, Americans donate billions of dollars to charity. Many donations are in cash. Others take the form of clothing and household items. With all this money involved, it's inevitable that some abuses occur. The new Pension Protection Act cracks down on abuses by requiring that all donations of clothing and household items be in "good used condition or better.